Ambedkar: What the Dalit icon wrote of Islam

    In his book, “Pakistan or the Partition of India”, towards the end of Chapter 4, Ambedkar writes, “The Muslim invaders, no doubt, came to India singing a hymn of hate against the Hindus. … Its (Islam’s) growth is so thick in Northern India that the remnants of Hindu and Buddhist culture are just shrubs. … Continue reading

The Message of Gandhi by Edgar Snow

Like Marx, Gandhi hated the state and wished to eliminate it, and he told me he considered himself “a philosophical anarchist.”

Civil Disobedience in a Democratic Regime | Gandhi versus Ambedkar, Part II

In the last post, I discussed the differences in Gandhi’s and Ambedkar’s attitudes towards civil disobedience of law in a democracy, and thus distinction in their visions of democracy itself. In this post, I continue on those differences to illustrate how Ambedkar’s model of democracy has some disturbing implications on freedom and is liable to … Continue reading

Civil Disobedience in a Democratic Regime | Gandhi versus Ambedkar, Part I

The notion of civil disobedience in a democratic scheme of things might seem contradictory. If a person willfully disobeys the law enacted by a government elected fair and square by popular vote, to most people there seems to be little reason to allow for such disobedience under law. However what such arguments fail to appreciate … Continue reading

The Sarvoya Movement

The pitfalls of nonviolent revolution by Brian Martin Nonviolent Revolution in India. Geoffrey Ostergaard New Delhi: Gandhi Peace Foundation, 1985 A review published in Nonviolence Today, number 2, April/May 1988, pp. 16-17 In Western countries such as Australia, the idea of nonviolent revolution is not a common one. Revolution is traditionally associated with the left, … Continue reading

RESISTING THE NATION STATE the pacifist and anarchist tradition (Excerpts)

RESISTING THE NATION STATE the pacifist and anarchist tradition by Geoffrey Ostergaard The collapse of the New Left coincided with the exhaustion of the less well-publicised Sarvodaya (welfare of all) movement for nonviolent revolution in India, led by Vinoba Bhave and Jayaprakash Narayan (1902-1979), which had sought through voluntary villagisation of land to realise Gandhi’s … Continue reading

Sarvodaya and Anarchism

In [the ideal state] every one is his own ruler. He rules himself in such a manner that he is never a hindrance to his neighbour. In [such a state], therefore, there is no political power because there is no State.’ –Gandhi (Young India, 2 July 1931; quoted in Ostergaard (1971), p. 28) The practical … Continue reading

Macropedia Index> Anarchism

An impressive example of the breadth of Anarchist influence is Mahatma Gandhi, who based his strategy of nonviolent civil disobedience in South Africa and India on the teachings of nonviolent Anarchists such as Tolstoy and Thoreau and who remembered his reading of Kropotkin when he devised for India the plan of a decentralized society based … Continue reading

Anarchist seeds beneath the snow: left-libertarian thought and British (Extract)

Anarchist seeds beneath the snow: left-libertarian thought and British -By David Goodway     Buy the book at:

Modern Anarchist Spirituality: Mohandas Gandhi

Undoubtedly, one of the most important influences on modern anarchist spirituality throughout the world is Mohandas Gandhi (1869–1948), who is widely known for his principles of nonviolence, cooperation, decentralization, and local self-sufficiency. Gandhi summarized his religious outlook as the belief that God is Truth, or more accurately, that Truth is God, and that the way … Continue reading