“Relearning Anarchism in India” by Jaimine Bezboznik

Source: http://www.readoo.in/2016/02/anarchy-in-india In India as elsewhere, anarchist thought is widely misunderstood. As Bhagat Singh (1907 – 1931), one of the few Indian revolutionaries who had explicit anarchist leanings, put it: “The people are scared of the word anarchism. The word anarchism has been abused so much that even in India revolutionaries have been called anarchist to … Continue reading

“The reason it’s so difficult to obtain progressive verdicts in India’s courts” by Girish Shahane

Source: http://scroll.in/article/716073/The-reason-it’s-so-difficult-to-obtain-progressive-verdicts-in-India’s-courts Liberals won a small victory on Tuesday when the Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional Section 66A of the Information Technology Act that had criminalised the transmission of electronic communications that had the potential to annoy or offend people. The phrasing of what constituted a crime was so vague that a large percentage … Continue reading

Seed Sharing Is the New Anarchy

Of all the methods of anarchist revolution, sharing fruit and vegetable seeds may be its most humble and seemingly innocuous. But as corporations like Monsanto seek to monopolize agriculture with its own patented brand of genetically modified crops, some are fighting back by reviving the ancient practice of seed sharing. It’s a grassroots attempt to … Continue reading

Originally posted on Unsettling America:
Decolonizing Anarchism examines the history of South Asian struggles against colonialism and neocolonialism, highlighting lesser-known dissidents as well as iconic figures. What emerges is an alternate narrative of decolonization, in which liberation is not defined by the achievement of a nation-state. Author Maia Ramnath suggests that the anarchist vision of…

Originally posted on travelerreport:
“Within 50 years, may be we will no more exist” worry the last 67.000 “parsi” of India, almost all of them living in Mumbaï, the economic capital of the country. This tight-knit community left Persia ( now Iran) in the VIII° century, fleeing the islamization of the country by Arab invaders. In fact, “parsi”…

Originally posted on travelerreport:
Gaduliya Lohar woman. Rajasthan, India. As usual, they are seated in front of their “gadi”, the chariot they use to travel as well as their house. While the man is making a pick by hammering on his anvil, his wife is rotating the bellows.  Timelessly, they repeat these gestures for hours…

Ambedkar: What the Dalit icon wrote of Islam

    In his book, “Pakistan or the Partition of India”, towards the end of Chapter 4, Ambedkar writes, “The Muslim invaders, no doubt, came to India singing a hymn of hate against the Hindus. … Its (Islam’s) growth is so thick in Northern India that the remnants of Hindu and Buddhist culture are just shrubs. … Continue reading

WHY I AM AN ATHEIST: BHAGAT SINGH

A new question has cropped up. Is it due to vanity that I do not believe in the existence of an omnipotent, omnipresent and omniscient God? I had never imagined that I would ever have to confront such a question. But conversation with some friends has given me, a hint that certain of my friends, if … Continue reading

Stories of Saadat Hasan Manto

Toba Tek Singh, Manto’s most memorable classic. While thousands are involved in the unprecedented communal frenzy that follows the announcement of Partition, the inmates of a mental asylum find themselves in a strange situation. The authorities have decided that while the Muslim inmates can stay back, the Hindu and Sikhs will have to go to … Continue reading

Dogs (A poem by Faiz Ahmed Faiz)

These stray dogs in the streets, Begging – an endowment their only treat. Curses from others, are their total effects, Abuses by the world, are their only assets. Neither rest at night, nor joy in the day, Filth is their abode, in gutters do they lay. If agitated, then turn them on one another, A … Continue reading